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Gianopulos named new chairman of Paramount Pictures

Viacom Inc. has named Jim Gianopulos the new chairman and chief executive officer of Paramount Pictures, hoping the former Fox chief can revive the flagging movie studio.

Gianopulos will succeed Paramount's former chairman, Brad Grey, who was ousted in February. Viacom Chief Executive Bob Bakish said Monday that Gianopulos will be able to deliver the hits needed to "begin the next chapter in Paramount's storied history."

But hits have lately been lacking for Paramount, which has trimmed its releases and seen its standing in Hollywood slide. Gianopulos has been tasked with setting a new strategy for Paramount, which lost $445 million in its 2016 fiscal year.

Gianopulos was pushed out of 20th Century Fox last year after running the studio for 16 years when Stacey Snider was promoted.

Gianopulos named new chairman of Paramount Pictures

Viacom Inc. has named Jim Gianopulos the new chairman and chief executive officer of Paramount Pictures, hoping the former Fox chief can revive the flagging movie studio.

Gianopulos will succeed Paramount's former chairman, Brad Grey, who was ousted in February. Viacom Chief Executive Bob Bakish said Monday that Gianopulos will be able to deliver the hits needed to "begin the next chapter in Paramount's storied history."

But hits have lately been lacking for Paramount, which has trimmed its releases and seen its standing in Hollywood slide. Gianopulos has been tasked with setting a new strategy for Paramount, which lost $445 million in its 2016 fiscal year.

Gianopulos was pushed out of 20th Century Fox last year after running the studio for 16 years when Stacey Snider was promoted.

Drake's new CD 'More Life' breaks a new streaming record

Drake, who was the most streamed act on Spotify last year, has started 2017 strong — his new album, "More Life," has broken the U.S. record for the number of online streams from a single album in one week.

The rapper's 22-track album recorded 385 million streams across all platforms in its first week, beating the previous record holder — Drake. His 2016 album, "Views," had owned the title with 245 million streams until "More Life" showed up on March 18, according to Nielsen Music.

"More Life" is Drake's seventh consecutive album to debut at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart. It had competition from new albums by Ed Sheeran, Rick Ross and the soundtrack for "Beauty and the Beast."

Drake's new CD 'More Life' breaks a new streaming record

Drake, who was the most streamed act on Spotify last year, has started 2017 strong — his new album, "More Life," has broken the U.S. record for the number of online streams from a single album in one week.

The rapper's 22-track album recorded 385 million streams across all platforms in its first week, beating the previous record holder — Drake. His 2016 album, "Views," had owned the title with 245 million streams until "More Life" showed up on March 18, according to Nielsen Music.

"More Life" is Drake's seventh consecutive album to debut at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart. It had competition from new albums by Ed Sheeran, Rick Ross and the soundtrack for "Beauty and the Beast."

George Lucas gives another $10M to USC for student diversity

George Lucas has given another $10 million to the University of Southern California's School of Cinematic Arts to fund the student diversity program he helped establish.

The donation was announced Monday by USC, Lucas' alma mater. Last fall, USC established a foundation in Lucas' name to support students from underrepresented communities who qualify for financial support. It was funded with an initial $10 million gift from the George Lucas Family Foundation.

Michael Renov, vice dean of academy affairs, said the gift will help USC "recruit storytellers whose voices are underrepresented in cinematic media and whose inclusion benefits all of us."

George Lucas gives another $10M to USC for student diversity

George Lucas has given another $10 million to the University of Southern California's School of Cinematic Arts to fund the student diversity program he helped establish.

The donation was announced Monday by USC, Lucas' alma mater. Last fall, USC established a foundation in Lucas' name to support students from underrepresented communities who qualify for financial support. It was funded with an initial $10 million gift from the George Lucas Family Foundation.

Michael Renov, vice dean of academy affairs, said the gift will help USC "recruit storytellers whose voices are underrepresented in cinematic media and whose inclusion benefits all of us."

Hannity angry at treatment by CBS in interview

Fox News Channel's Sean Hannity is calling on CBS News to release the full tape of his interview with Ted Koppel for "Sunday Morning," in which the veteran "Nightline" anchor answered "yes" when Hannity asked if Koppel thought he was bad for America.

The exchange between two different generations of television news personalities continued to resonate Monday: It was the lead "hot topic" that hosts of "The View" kicked around on their talk show.

Hannity was interviewed for the Sunday show's cover story about partisan media, and sensed some unease by Koppel when he discussed his role as an opinion host. Hannity is a fervent supporter of President Donald Trump and has attacked his opponents and traditional media outlets for how they report on the president.

"You're cynical," Hannity said.

"I am cynical, Koppel replied.

"Do you think we're bad for America? You think I'm bad for America?" Hannity asked.

"Yeah," Koppel said.

Koppel said he lumped Hannity in with other opinion shows and that while he thought Hannity was "very good at what you do," his audience feels ideology is more important than facts.

It was one of two excerpts of Koppel's interview with Hannity that was included in the broader 10-minute story, and it quickly attracted attention. CBS News fanned it, breaking out a 45-second clip of their exchange for its website and writing a story about it.

Hannity, in a series of tweets, criticized the report as "fake edited news. I did about a 45-minute interview with CBS. They ran less than two. Why did Ted cut out my many examples of media bias?" He called on CBS to release the unedited interview so people could see the "games" being played by editors.

Hannity didn't indicate that his words were edited to make them appear misleading; he just seemed upset that so much got left on the cutting-room floor.

CBS News didn't respond to Hannity's request Monday. Koppel said he was content to let the story speak for itself.

Koppel has expressed similar opinions before. In an appearance on Fox's "The O'Reilly Factor" last year, Koppel told host Bill O'Reilly that he had changed the television landscape by taking news from being objective and dull to subjective and entertaining. When O'Reilly said that Koppel believed that "people like me have ruined the country," the former ABC newsman answered, "That's right."

In 2012, Koppel also took MSNBC's liberal host Rachel Maddow to task in a speech at the National Press Club.

"I don't want to know what she thinks about these issues," he said. "I really don't. I want to hear her informed reporting. I want to hear her interview people with that sharp mind of hers."

CBS News released a lengthier outtake of Koppel's interview with Hannity online Saturday, before the television report aired. Hannity discussed his working class background, criticisms of former President Barack Obama and his attitudes toward liberals and journalism.

"We are stuck in an ideological rut and programs like yours, popular as you are, haven't helped," Koppel said.

Hannity angry at treatment by CBS in interview

Fox News Channel's Sean Hannity is calling on CBS News to release the full tape of his interview with Ted Koppel for "Sunday Morning," in which the veteran "Nightline" anchor answered "yes" when Hannity asked if Koppel thought he was bad for America.

The exchange between two different generations of television news personalities continued to resonate Monday: It was the lead "hot topic" that hosts of "The View" kicked around on their talk show.

Hannity was interviewed for the Sunday show's cover story about partisan media, and sensed some unease by Koppel when he discussed his role as an opinion host. Hannity is a fervent supporter of President Donald Trump and has attacked his opponents and traditional media outlets for how they report on the president.

"You're cynical," Hannity said.

"I am cynical, Koppel replied.

"Do you think we're bad for America? You think I'm bad for America?" Hannity asked.

"Yeah," Koppel said.

Koppel said he lumped Hannity in with other opinion shows and that while he thought Hannity was "very good at what you do," his audience feels ideology is more important than facts.

It was one of two excerpts of Koppel's interview with Hannity that was included in the broader 10-minute story, and it quickly attracted attention. CBS News fanned it, breaking out a 45-second clip of their exchange for its website and writing a story about it.

Hannity, in a series of tweets, criticized the report as "fake edited news. I did about a 45-minute interview with CBS. They ran less than two. Why did Ted cut out my many examples of media bias?" He called on CBS to release the unedited interview so people could see the "games" being played by editors.

Hannity didn't indicate that his words were edited to make them appear misleading; he just seemed upset that so much got left on the cutting-room floor.

CBS News didn't respond to Hannity's request Monday. Koppel said he was content to let the story speak for itself.

Koppel has expressed similar opinions before. In an appearance on Fox's "The O'Reilly Factor" last year, Koppel told host Bill O'Reilly that he had changed the television landscape by taking news from being objective and dull to subjective and entertaining. When O'Reilly said that Koppel believed that "people like me have ruined the country," the former ABC newsman answered, "That's right."

In 2012, Koppel also took MSNBC's liberal host Rachel Maddow to task in a speech at the National Press Club.

"I don't want to know what she thinks about these issues," he said. "I really don't. I want to hear her informed reporting. I want to hear her interview people with that sharp mind of hers."

CBS News released a lengthier outtake of Koppel's interview with Hannity online Saturday, before the television report aired. Hannity discussed his working class background, criticisms of former President Barack Obama and his attitudes toward liberals and journalism.

"We are stuck in an ideological rut and programs like yours, popular as you are, haven't helped," Koppel said.

Barry Jenkins' next project? 'The Underground Railroad'

"Moonlight" director Barry Jenkins will follow up his Oscar-winning film with a drama series for Amazon based on Colson Whitehead's "The Underground Railroad."

Amazon announced Monday that it will develop the TV series, with Jenkins writing and directing the adaptation of the 2016 National Book Award winner. Whitehead's "The Underground Railroad" is a part-historic, part-surrealistic novel about a slave who escapes on an actual railroad.

"Going back to The Intuitionist, Colson's writing has always defied convention, and The Underground Railroad is no different," said Jenkins in a statement. "It's a groundbreaking work that pays respect to our nation's history while using the form to explore it in a thoughtful and original way. Preserving the sweep and grandeur of a story like this requires bold, innovative thinking and in Amazon we've found a partner whose reverence for storytelling and freeness of form is wholly in line with our vision."

Jenkins has already been at work on the series, though how many episodes are planned was not announced. He is to write and direct.

"Moonlight," which last month won best picture, was Jenkins' second film following 2008's well-regarded but little-seen "Medicine for Melancholy." Made for just $1.5 million, "Moonlight" has grossed more than $56 million worldwide. It also won Academy Awards for Jenkins' screenplay, based on Tarell Alvin McCraney's play, and for Mahershala Ali's supporting performance.

"The Underground Railroad" will reunite much of the team behind "Moonlight." Like that film, it will be produced by Adele Romanski and Brad Pitt's Plan B.

Barry Jenkins' next project? 'The Underground Railroad'

"Moonlight" director Barry Jenkins will follow up his Oscar-winning film with a drama series for Amazon based on Colson Whitehead's "The Underground Railroad."

Amazon announced Monday that it will develop the TV series, with Jenkins writing and directing the adaptation of the 2016 National Book Award winner. Whitehead's "The Underground Railroad" is a part-historic, part-surrealistic novel about a slave who escapes on an actual railroad.

"Going back to The Intuitionist, Colson's writing has always defied convention, and The Underground Railroad is no different," said Jenkins in a statement. "It's a groundbreaking work that pays respect to our nation's history while using the form to explore it in a thoughtful and original way. Preserving the sweep and grandeur of a story like this requires bold, innovative thinking and in Amazon we've found a partner whose reverence for storytelling and freeness of form is wholly in line with our vision."

Jenkins has already been at work on the series, though how many episodes are planned was not announced. He is to write and direct.

"Moonlight," which last month won best picture, was Jenkins' second film following 2008's well-regarded but little-seen "Medicine for Melancholy." Made for just $1.5 million, "Moonlight" has grossed more than $56 million worldwide. It also won Academy Awards for Jenkins' screenplay, based on Tarell Alvin McCraney's play, and for Mahershala Ali's supporting performance.

"The Underground Railroad" will reunite much of the team behind "Moonlight." Like that film, it will be produced by Adele Romanski and Brad Pitt's Plan B.

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