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Kurt Cobain's daughter, Frances Bean, pays tribute to late father on his 50th birthday

The daughter of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love paid a heartwarming tribute to her late father on what would have been his 50th birthday.

According to ABC News, Frances Bean Cobain, 24, took to social media Monday to share a message to the grunge rock legend, who died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in April 1994.

"Today would have been your 50th birthday," she wrote in an Instagram post. "You are loved and you are missed. Thank you for giving me the gift of life. Forever your daughter, Frances Bean Cobain."

>> See the post here

February 20th 2017. Happy Birthday. A post shared by Frances Bean Cobain (@space_witch666) on Feb 20, 2017 at 12:01am PST <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script>

She also shared an image of a text message exchange with her grandmother, Wendy Cobain.

"I love you so much," Frances Bean Cobain wrote. "Thank you for being my one and only Grams. I wouldn't trade you for the world and I know he is thankful that you raised me to be as strong & compassionate as you are."

>> Read more trending news

Wendy Cobain responded, "Ohhh, what beautiful words from his beloved daughter. You were such a caring, loving little girl and have turned into such a beautiful young woman. He would be so 'smugly' proud of you, saying, 'Hey, that's MY daughter.' I love you with all my heart. Thank God you were here for me to love & care for. Grams."

Frances Bean Cobain captioned the image, "Not gonna lie, I cried a little."

>> See the post here

Not gonna lie, I cried a little. I love you grams. A post shared by Frances Bean Cobain (@space_witch666) on Feb 20, 2017 at 11:39am PST <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script>

Circus lionized for cutting animal acts will bring them back

A circus is under fire for bringing back animal acts a year after earning praise from animal rights groups for dropping them to keep up with changing public attitudes.

The Melha Shrine Circus, which has seven performances over four days scheduled for May in western Massachusetts, brought back performing elephants, tigers and dogs because that's what people want, circus chairman Allen Zippin said.

The circus, which raises money for the fraternal organization's charitable endeavors — including the Shriners Hospitals for Children in Springfield — lost money for the first time in its 63-year history in 2016.

"Paid attendance was down 6,500 people last year," when compared to 2015, he said. "We had people asking for refunds after finding out there were no animals."

Animal rights activists have been pressuring circuses to drop animal acts for years, saying the acts are cruel and inhumane.

The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus retired its iconic elephant act last spring. Months later, the nation's most famous circus announced it would close for good this year after almost a century and a half in business.

Although several reasons for the demise were cited, the end of the elephant act and changing public attitudes about animal-based entertainment were among them.

Circuses, whether commercial or charitable, don't need animals to thrill, said Sheryl Becker, who started an online petition to get the Melha Shriners to drop animal acts. There are plenty of circuses that don't have them, including Cirque du Soleil and Circus Smirkus. Some other Shriners-sponsored circuses have stopped hiring animal acts, said Becker, who is president of Western Massachusetts Animal Rights Advocates.

Her petition had more than 66,000 signatures as of Friday.

Becker loves the Shriners and supports their mission wholeheartedly, but thinks hiring animal acts to perform in the circus tarnishes their image.

Her late father was a Shriner who took her to the Melha Shrine Circus as a child. Like most kids, she was enamored with the animals. But her attitude changed in her early teens.

She says the animals are treated inhumanely, housed in cramped conditions and receive inadequate veterinary care.

"It is fear itself that makes these animals do these stupid and degrading tricks," she said.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals had praised the Melha Shriners last year, but the group was quick to condemn the return of animal acts.

"The decision to bring back animals is foolish, short-sighted and out of touch," said Rachel Mathews, PETA's associate director of captive animal law enforcement.

Forcing animals to perform "confusing and uncomfortable" tricks sends the wrong message to the very people the circus is trying to entertain.

"All it does is teach kids that it's OK to bully and subjugate," she said.

Zippin said he appreciates the important watchdog role animal rights groups perform. The Shriners, he said, take great care to ensure that the acts they hire treat their animals with love and care.

He said he even envisions a day when animal acts will be eliminated from all circuses.

Noted movie critic Richard Schickel dies at 84

Richard Schickel, a noted movie critic for Life and Time magazines who also wrote dozens of books and made documentaries about Hollywood, has died. He was 84.

Schickel, who'd had a series of strokes, died on Saturday in Los Angeles from complications of dementia, his daughter, Erika Schickel, told the New York Times.

"He was one of the fathers of American film criticism," she told the Los Angeles Times. "He had a singular voice. When he wrote or spoke, he had an old-fashioned way of turning a phrase. He was blunt and succinct both on the page and in life."

In a career that spanned a half-century, Schickel told it like it was — or as he saw it — whether the flick was a star-heavy blockbuster or a gritty independent production.

He loved "Citizen Kane" but thought "The Maltese Falcon" was "cramped and static."

Shickel was "witty, analytical, tough-minded but always fair, a gifted stylist who believed in honesty but steered clear of cheap shots," Los Angeles Times film critic Kenneth Turan wrote.

"He wrote from the perspective of a film insider but responded to films from a gut level and never lost the sense of being an average filmgoer reacting to what was on the screen," Richard Zoglin, a fellow critic and now a contributing editor at Time, told The New York Times.

Schickel estimated that he had seen more than 22,000 motion pictures, beginning with Walt Disney's "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" when he was 5 years old.

But the Milwaukee-born writer was no snob about his passion.

In his 2015 memoir, he wrote: "I just like to be there in the dark watching something — almost anything, if truth be known."

He also liked to write about them. He was a Life magazine reviewer from 1965 until the magazine closed in 1972, then worked for Time until 2010. He later wrote for the blog Truthdig.com.

Shickel also wrote, co-wrote or edited nearly 40 books, including biographies of luminaries such as Woody Allen and Clint Eastwood and he wrote or directed nearly 40 documentaries on Hollywood and its players.

Shickel counted among his acquaintances the likes of Eastwood, director Stanley Kubrick and "Chinatown" screenwriter Robert Towne.

In addition to his daughter Erika, Shickel is survived by a daughter, Jessica Vild; a step-daughter, Ali Rubinstein and four grandchildren.

Noted movie critic Richard Schickel dies at 84

Richard Schickel, a noted movie critic for Life and Time magazines who also wrote dozens of books and made documentaries about Hollywood, has died. He was 84.

Schickel, who'd had a series of strokes, died on Saturday in Los Angeles from complications of dementia, his daughter, Erika Schickel, told the New York Times.

"He was one of the fathers of American film criticism," she told the Los Angeles Times. "He had a singular voice. When he wrote or spoke, he had an old-fashioned way of turning a phrase. He was blunt and succinct both on the page and in life."

In a career that spanned a half-century, Schickel told it like it was — or as he saw it — whether the flick was a star-heavy blockbuster or a gritty independent production.

He loved "Citizen Kane" but thought "The Maltese Falcon" was "cramped and static."

Shickel was "witty, analytical, tough-minded but always fair, a gifted stylist who believed in honesty but steered clear of cheap shots," Los Angeles Times film critic Kenneth Turan wrote.

"He wrote from the perspective of a film insider but responded to films from a gut level and never lost the sense of being an average filmgoer reacting to what was on the screen," Richard Zoglin, a fellow critic and now a contributing editor at Time, told The New York Times.

Schickel estimated that he had seen more than 22,000 motion pictures, beginning with Walt Disney's "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" when he was 5 years old.

But the Milwaukee-born writer was no snob about his passion.

In his 2015 memoir, he wrote: "I just like to be there in the dark watching something — almost anything, if truth be known."

He also liked to write about them. He was a Life magazine reviewer from 1965 until the magazine closed in 1972, then worked for Time until 2010. He later wrote for the blog Truthdig.com.

Shickel also wrote, co-wrote or edited nearly 40 books, including biographies of luminaries such as Woody Allen and Clint Eastwood and he wrote or directed nearly 40 documentaries on Hollywood and its players.

Shickel counted among his acquaintances the likes of Eastwood, director Stanley Kubrick and "Chinatown" screenwriter Robert Towne.

In addition to his daughter Erika, Shickel is survived by a daughter, Jessica Vild; a step-daughter, Ali Rubinstein and four grandchildren.

Jazz fusion guitarist Larry Coryell dies in NYC at age 73

Jazz guitarist Larry Coryell, known as the "Godfather of Fusion," has died in New York City. He was 73.

His publicist, Kurt Nishimura, said Coryell died Sunday in his hotel room of natural causes. Nishimura says he had just performed two shows at the Iridium on Friday and Saturday.

Coryell grew up in the Seattle area. After taking up the guitar, he moved to New York City in 1965.

Coryell's eclectic career includes collaborations with many of the jazz greats, including Miles Davis, Gary Burton, Alphonse Mouzon and Chet Baker. His works often mixed jazz, classical and rock ingredients.

In 1969, he recorded "Spaces," his most noted album. Many say it sparked the emergence of the jazz fusion movement.

Coryell is survived by his wife, two daughters and two sons.

Jazz fusion guitarist Larry Coryell dies in NYC at age 73

Jazz guitarist Larry Coryell, known as the "Godfather of Fusion," has died in New York City. He was 73.

His publicist, Kurt Nishimura, said Coryell died Sunday in his hotel room of natural causes. Nishimura says he had just performed two shows at the Iridium on Friday and Saturday.

Coryell grew up in the Seattle area. After taking up the guitar, he moved to New York City in 1965.

Coryell's eclectic career includes collaborations with many of the jazz greats, including Miles Davis, Gary Burton, Alphonse Mouzon and Chet Baker. His works often mixed jazz, classical and rock ingredients.

In 1969, he recorded "Spaces," his most noted album. Many say it sparked the emergence of the jazz fusion movement.

Coryell is survived by his wife, two daughters and two sons.

Fox News host Brenda Buttner dies at age 55

Brenda Buttner, host of Fox News Channel's "Bulls and Bears" has died after a battle with cancer. She was 55.

Buttner served as CNBC's Washington correspondent and hosted the network's "The Money Club" before joining Fox News in 2000.

Buttner graduated from Harvard University and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University.

Fox News host Neil Cavuto paid tribute to Buttner on his show "Your World with Neil Cavuto." He praised her intelligence and sense of humor, saying "business journalism is never going to be the same."

Fox News announced her death on Monday.

Fox News host Brenda Buttner dies at age 55

Brenda Buttner, host of Fox News Channel's "Bulls and Bears" has died after a battle with cancer. She was 55.

Buttner served as CNBC's Washington correspondent and hosted the network's "The Money Club" before joining Fox News in 2000.

Buttner graduated from Harvard University and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University.

Fox News host Neil Cavuto paid tribute to Buttner on his show "Your World with Neil Cavuto." He praised her intelligence and sense of humor, saying "business journalism is never going to be the same."

Fox News announced her death on Monday.

David Cassidy reveals he has dementia

After a recent concert in California, former teen idol David Cassidy got viral attention for the wrong reasons after footage of his show hit the internet.

Cassidy, 66, appeared drunk, confused and disoriented during his Agoura Hills, California, show, where he often slurred his words and forgot the lyrics to his songs.

Many assumed that Cassidy had relapsed to alcohol abuse after spending years in and out of rehab. While that could still be the case, Cassidy said that there is a far worse thing going on.

>> Read more trending stories

People reported that his grandfather and mother before him, Cassidy has dementia.

"I was in denial, but a part of me always knew this was coming," Cassidy told People.

Prior to his show in California, Cassidy announced he would retire from touring. Now it seems that this decision was brought on by health reasons.

"I want to focus on what I am, who I am and how I've been without any distractions," he told People. "I want to love. I want to enjoy life."

In 2012, Cassidy opened up about his mother's illness during an interview with the Daily Mail.

"As people are now living well into their 80s, the cases of dementia and Alzheimer's are on the increase," Cassidy said.  "My mother has been in 24-hour nursing care for seven years now, and I'm lucky to be able to afford it, but many people aren't that lucky."

"People don't really want to talk about it, but we need to, which is why I'm going to be speaking publicly about it."

Fox News reported that Cassidy's mother died at age 89 in 2013. 

Venezuelan art promoter, journalist Sofia Imber dies at 92

Sofia Imber, who turned a garage into the Caracas Museum of Contemporary Art and became one of Venezuela's most influential women journalists, died Monday in the capital. She was 92.

The former director of what was once among Latin America's most important art galleries succumbed to complications due to old age, her biographer, Diego Arroyo Gil, told The Associated Press.

Imber's television program "Buenos Dias," which she hosted with her second husband from 1969 to 1993, was a landmark of Venezuelan journalism and politics. She became famous for her cutting interviews with global leaders such as former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Israel's Simon Peres and the Dalai Lama as well as with writers like Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

Social media was flooded by people lamenting her death. "Good journey, dear Sofia Imber. You gave us art, you gave us culture, you gave us an example of tireless work. That was your best piece," humorist Eduardo Edo Sanabria said on Twitter.

In 1971, when Venezuelan authorities were looking for a place to display art, Imber famously said: "If you give me a garage, I will turn it into a museum."

Three years after, she created a foundation to transform an auto parts garage into the first museum of modern art in Venezuela. In less than a decade, it had grown to hold pieces by Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Henry Moore, Fernando Botero and many Venezuelan artists. At one point, it had more than 4,000 works and received more than 15,000 visitors a month.

Imber, a critic of the socialist government established by the late President Hugo Chavez, was laid off as the museum's director by Chavez in 2001. She called her dismissal "one of the most painful moments" of her life.

"The president forgot or did not want to recognize the courage and the dedication of this wonderful woman," artist Jesus Soto told AP before his death in 2005.

Before being fired as museum director, she created a program to bring paintings and sculpture to suburbs and faraway places. In 1967, she became the first Latin American woman to win UNESCO's Picasso Medal. She also received awards in Brazil, France, Chile, Colombia, Italy, Mexico and Spain.

"Sofia Imber took contemporary art to the most remote areas of the country," Soto said.

Born in Soroca, Moldova, then in the former Soviet Union, she arrived in Venezuela in 1930 with her family. She later graduated from Central University of Venezuela.

In 1944, she married Guillermo Meneses and they had four children. Meneses later held diplomatic posts in Paris and Brussels, where the couple met intellectuals and artists like Picasso, Andre Malraux and William Faulkner.

The couple divorced in 1964 and she later married journalist Carlos Rangel.

In a speech after being let go as director of the Caracas art museum, she said: "I want to be remembered as a worker and tireless woman."

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