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U2 makes post-concert stop at Whataburger in Houston 

After another grueling concert on the road, U2 can be forgiven for acting in mysterious ways. The Irish rock ’n’ roll band finished their show in Houston on Wednesday night and decided to eat at a local Whataburger, KDFW reported.

>> Read more trending news

After arriving, members of the band posed for photographs with some police officers, including Adam Clayton, who was wearing a kimono.

Larry Mullen Jr. also posed in the photo. A Twitter user, Boomcha, posted “Meanwhile at Whataburger,” along with a photo of the police posing with band members.

There were no photos of Bono or Edge, but perhaps they still hadn’t found what they were looking for inside the fast food restaurant.

Rocker Gregg Allman dies at age 69; sang and lived the blues

Gregg Allman, a survivor of tragedy, knew the blues musically and in a painfully personal way.

Raised by a single mother after his father was shot to death, he idolized his guitar-slinging older brother, Duane, and became his musical partner. They formed the nucleus of The Allman Brothers Band, which helped define the Southern rock sound of the 1970s.

Their songs such as "Whipping Post," ''Ramblin' Man" and "Midnight Rider" laid the foundation for the genre and opened the doors for groups like Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Marshall Tucker Band.

Gregg Allman, whose bluesy vocals and soulful touch on the Hammond B-3 organ helped propel the Allman Brothers Band to superstardom, died Saturday. He was 69.

Allman died peacefully and surrounded by loved ones at his home near Savannah, his manager, Michael Lehman, told The Associated Press. He blamed cancer for Allman's death.

"It's a result of his reoccurrence of liver cancer that had come back five years ago," Lehman said in an interview. "He kept it very private because he wanted to continue to play music until he couldn't."

Allman played his last concert in October as health problems forced him to cancel other 2016 shows. He announced Aug. 5 that he was "under his doctor's care at the Mayo Clinic" due to "serious health issues." Later that year, he canceled more dates, citing a throat injury. In March, he canceled performances for the rest of 2017.

Born in Nashville, Tennessee, the rock star known for his long blond hair was raised in Florida.

In his 2012 memoir, "My Cross to Bear," Allman described how his older brother was a central figure in his life in the years after their father was murdered by a man he met in a bar. The two boys endured a spell in a military school before being swept up in rock music in their teens. Although Gregg was the first to pick up a guitar, it was Duane who excelled at it. So Gregg later switched to the organ.

They spent years in bands together, but failed to crack success until they formed The Allman Brothers Band in 1969. It featured extended jams, tight guitar harmonies by Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, rhythms from a pair of drummers and the smoky blues inflected voice of Gregg Allman.

Based in Macon, Georgia, the group also had drummers Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson and Butch Trucks and bassist Berry Oakley. They reached the pinnacle of the burgeoning music scene, partying to excess while defining a sound that still excites millions.

Their self-titled debut album came out in 1969, but it was their seminal live album "At Fillmore East" in 1971 that catapulted the band to stardom. Considered one of the greatest live albums ever made, the two LP record opened with their version of Blind Willie McTell's "Statesboro Blues," with Duane Allman on slide guitar. The album introduced fans to their fusion of blues, rock and jazz.

Duane Allman had quickly ascended to the pantheon of guitar heroes, not just from his contributions to the Allman band, but from his session work with Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett and with Eric Clapton on the classic "Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs" album. But he was killed in a motorcycle accident in October 1971, just months after recording the Fillmore shows. Another motorcycle accident the following year claimed Oakley's life.

Keyboard player Chuck Leavell joined the band following Duane Allman's death and the band continued to soar. Their follow-up to the Fillmore album, "Eat a Peach," became their first top 10 album and featured some of their most popular recordings, including "Melissa" and "Blue Sky."

Gregg Allman said in a 1998 interview with The Associated Press that he and Betts mourned his brother's death in music.

"We used to write songs in a graveyard in Macon," Allman said. "One thing everybody thought was Duane would come back to haunt us if we did not keep going. He had the most passion for music of any man I've ever seen."

In a 2012 interview with The Associated Press, he said Duane remained on his mind every day. Once in a while, he could even feel his presence.

"I can tell when he's there, man," Allman said. "I'm not going to get all cosmic on you. But listen, he's there."

The 1970s brought more highly publicized turmoil: Allman was compelled to testify in a drug case against a former road manager for the band and his marriage to the actress and singer Cher was short-lived even by show business standards.

In 1975, Cher and Allman married three days after she divorced her husband and singing partner, Sonny Bono. Their marriage was tumultuous from the start; Cher requested a divorce just nine days after their Las Vegas wedding, although she dismissed the suit a month later.

Together they released a widely panned duets album under the name "Allman and Woman." They had one child together, Elijah Blue, and Cher filed for legal separation in 1977. Allman said in an interview with Viva magazine in 1977 that he regretted marrying Cher and said that they probably could have fallen in love if it hadn't been for his drug abuse.

The Allman Brothers Band likewise split up in the 1980s and then re-formed several times over the years. A changing cast of players has included Derek Trucks, nephew of original drummer Butch Trucks, as well as guitarist Warren Haynes.

Starting in 1990, more than 20 years after its founding, the reunited band began releasing new music and found a new audience. In 1995 the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and they won a Grammy Award for best rock instrumental performance for "Jessica" the following year.

In 2000, Betts was ousted from the band via fax for alleged substance abuse and poor performance and he hasn't played with the band since.

Butch Trucks died in January 2017. Authorities said he shot himself in front of his wife at their Florida home.

In his memoir, Allman said he spent years overindulging in women, drugs and alcohol before getting sober in the mid-1990s. He said that after getting sober, he felt "brand new" at the age of 50.

"I never believed in God until this," he said in an interview with The Associated Press in 1998. "I asked him to bring me out of this or let me die before all the innings have been played. Now I have started taking on some spiritualism."

However, after all the years of unhealthy living he ended up with hepatitis C which severely damaged his liver. He underwent a liver transplant in 2010.

After the surgery, he turned music to help him recover and released his first solo album in 14 years "Low Country Blues" in 2011.

"I think it's because you're doing something you love," Allman said in a 2011 interview with The Associated Press. "I think it just creates a diversion from the pain itself. You've been swallowed up by something you love, you know, and you're just totally engulfed."

The band was honored with a lifetime achievement Grammy in 2012.

____

Hall reported from Nashville, Tennessee. Associated Press Writer Hillel Italie in New York City contributed to this report.

Jet owned by Elvis auctioned after sitting 35 years

A private jet once owned by Elvis Presley has been auctioned after sitting on a runway in New Mexico for 35 years.

The plane sold for $430,000 on Saturday at an Agoura Hills, California, event featuring celebrity memorabilia, GWS Auctions Inc. said.

The buyer was not disclosed in the sold note posted on the firm's website, and auctioneer Brigitte Kruse said she could not immediate release information about the buyer or the buyer's plans for the plane.

The auction house says Elvis designed the interior that has gold-tone woodwork, red velvet seats and red shag carpet. But the red 1962 Lockheed Jetstar has no engine and needs a restoration of its cockpit.

The 1962 red Lockheed JetStar was owned by Elvis and his father, Vernon Presley, Liveauctioneers.com says.

It has been privately owned for 35 years and sitting on a tarmac in Roswell, New Mexico.

Photos of the plane show the exterior in need of restoration and seats of the cockpit torn.

A previous owner of the private jet disputed the auction house's claim the king of rock 'n' roll designed its red velvet interior.

Roy McKay told KOB-TV in Albuquerque (https://goo.gl/GpE3zV) on Tuesday he designed the interior himself. McKay said that when he purchased the red 1962 Lockheed Jetstar, it had a two-toned gray interior and "kind of looked like a casket."

But then-GWS spokesman Carl Carter told The Associated Press the auction house is confident Elvis designed the interior, which photos show has red velvet seats and red shag carpet.

Federal Aviation Administration records show no interior changes were ever made to the jet, Carter said.

Presley was born in Tupelo on Jan. 8, 1935, and moved to Memphis with his parents at age 13. He became a leading figure in the fledgling rockabilly scene by covering songs originally performed by African-American artists like Big Mama Thornton ("Hound Dog") and Arthur Crudup ("That's All Right").

His provocative dancing and hit records turned him into one of the 20th century's most recognizable icons. Historians say his music also helped usher in the fall of racial segregation.

Elvis was 42 when he died on Aug. 16, 1977, in Memphis.

Southern rock founding father Gregg Allman dies at age 69

Music legend Gregg Allman, whose bluesy vocals and soulful touch on the Hammond B-3 organ helped propel The Allman Brothers Band to superstardom and spawn Southern rock, died Saturday, his manager said. He was 69.

Allman died peacefully and surrounded by loved ones at his home near Savannah, Georgia, his manager, Michael Lehman, told The Associated Press. He blamed cancer for Allman's death.

"It's a result of his reoccurrence of liver cancer that had come back five years ago," Lehman said in an interview. "He kept it very private because he wanted to continue to play music until he couldn't."

Allman played his last concert in October as health problems forced him to cancel other 2016 shows. He announced on Aug. 5 that he was "under his doctor's care at the Mayo Clinic" due to "serious health issues." Later that year, he canceled more dates, citing a throat injury. In March, he canceled performances for the rest of 2017.

Funeral arrangements had not been finalized Saturday. But Lehman said Allman would be buried alongside his late brother, founding Allman Brothers guitarist Duane Allman, at Rose Hill Cemetery in Macon, where the band got its start nearly five decades ago.

"He'll be laid next to his brother, Duane," Lehman said. "That's in his wishes."

Southern rock and country musician Charlie Daniels said via Twitter, "Gregg Allman had a feeling for the blues very few ever have hard to believe that magnificent voice is stilled forever."

Born in Nashville, Tennessee, the rock star known for his long blond hair was raised in Florida by a single mother. Allman idolized his older brother, Duane, eventually joining a series of bands with him. Together they formed the nucleus of The Allman Brothers Band.

The original band featured extended jams, tight guitar harmonies by Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, rhythms from a pair of drummers and the smoky, blues-inflected voice of Gregg Allman. Songs such as "Whipping Post," ''Ramblin' Man" and "Midnight Rider" helped define what came to be known as Southern rock and opened the doors for such stars as Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Marshall Tucker Band.

In his 2012 memoir, "My Cross to Bear," Allman described how Duane was a central figure in his life in the years after their father was murdered by a man he met in a bar. The two boys endured a spell in a military school before being swept up in rock music in their teens. Although Gregg was the first to pick up a guitar, it was Duane who excelled at it. So Gregg later switched to the organ.

They failed to crack success until they formed The Allman Brothers Band in 1969. Based in Macon, Georgia, the group featured Betts, drummers Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson and Butch Trucks and bassist Berry Oakley. They partied to excess while defining a sound that still excites millions.

Their self-titled debut album came out in 1969, but it was their seminal live album "At Fillmore East" in 1971 that catapulted the band to stardom.

Duane Allman had quickly ascended to the pantheon of guitar heroes, not just from his contributions to the Allman band, but from his session work with Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett and with Eric Clapton on the classic "Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs" album. But he was killed in a motorcycle accident in October 1971, just months after recording the Fillmore shows. Another motorcycle accident the following year claimed Oakley's life. .

In a 2012 interview with The Associated Press, Gregg Allman said Duane remained on his mind every day. Once in a while, he could even feel his presence.

"I can tell when he's there, man," Allman said. "I'm not going to get all cosmic on you. But listen, he's there."

The 1970s brought more highly publicized turmoil: Allman was compelled to testify in a drug case against a former road manager for the band and his marriage to the actress and singer Cher was short-lived even by show business standards.

In 1975, Cher and Allman married three days after she divorced her husband and singing partner, Sonny Bono. Their marriage was tumultuous from the start; Cher requested a divorce just nine days after their Las Vegas wedding, although she dismissed the suit a month later.

Together they released a widely panned duets album under the name "Allman and Woman." They had one child together, Elijah Blue, and Cher filed for legal separation in 1977.

Cher said via Twitter on Saturday, "IVE TRIED.WORDS ARE IMPOSSIBLE."

The Allman Brothers Band likewise split up in the 1980s and then re-formed several times over the years. A changing cast of players has included Derek Trucks, nephew of original drummer Butch Trucks, as well as guitarist Warren Haynes.

Starting in 1990, more than 20 years after its founding, the reunited band began releasing new music and found a new audience. In 1995 the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and won a Grammy Award for best rock instrumental performance for "Jessica" the following year.

In 2000, Betts was ousted from the band via fax for alleged substance abuse and poor performance and he hasn't played with the band since.

Butch Trucks died in January 2017. Authorities said he shot himself in front of his wife at their Florida home.

Lehman said Allman had recently finished what would be his final album, titled Southern Blood and scheduled for release in September.

"He actually just listened to a few tracks of it last night and was really passionate and excited for that record to be complete," Lehman said.

In his memoir, Allman said he spent years overindulging in women, drugs and alcohol before getting sober in the mid-1990s. He said that after getting sober, he felt "brand new" at the age of 50.

"I never believed in God until this," he said in an interview with The Associated Press in 1998. "I asked him to bring me out of this or let me die before all the innings have been played. Now I have started taking on some spiritualism."

However, after all the years of unhealthy living he ended up with hepatitis C which severely damaged his liver. He underwent a liver transplant in 2010.

The statement on Allman's website says that as he faced health problems, "Gregg considered being on the road playing music with his brothers and solo band for his beloved fans essential medicine for his soul. Playing music lifted him up and kept him going during the toughest of times."

After the surgery, he turned music to help him recover and released his first solo album in 14 years "Low Country Blues" in 2011.

"I think it's because you're doing something you love," Allman said in a 2011 interview with The Associated Press. "I think it just creates a diversion from the pain itself. You've been swallowed up by something you love, you know, and you're just totally engulfed."

The band was honored with a lifetime achievement Grammy in 2012.

___

Hall reported from Nashville, Tennessee.

Legendary musician Gregg Allman dies at 69

Legendary southern rock musician Gregg Allman has died, according to a posting on his official website. He was 69.

The statement on the official website reads in part: “It is with deep sadness that we announce that Gregg Allman, a founding member of The Allman Brothers Band, passed away peacefully at his home in Savannah, Georgia.”

>> Read more trending news

The musician had been in poor health recently. He had undergone a liver transplant in 2010.

Allman founded The Allman Brothers Band with his late brother, Duane. 

The music community took to social media to express their condolences.

Judge blocks construction of airstrip by actor Bruce Willis

A judge has blocked actor Bruce Willis' plan to build a private airstrip in central Idaho.

The Idaho Mountain Express (http://bit.ly/2r6T4Gr ) reports that 5th District Judge Robert Elgee ruled that Camas County commissioners violated state law when drafting an ordinance allowing individuals to obtain conditional-use permits to build a private airport in agricultural-zoned county lands.

Willis began construction on an 8,500-foot dirt runway last year. However, the project was halted in September after Planning and Zoning Administrator Dwight Butlin discovered that the airport site was on land zoned for agricultural use.

Work was allowed to resume when the county tweaked the ordinance, which sparked a lawsuit filed by Camas County residents.

Elgee said in his May 19 ruling that Camas County showed a "complete disregard" for property rights and the well-being of the neighborhood.

Camas County Attorney Matt Pember said the county was disappointed with the judge's decision.

___

Information from: Idaho Mountain Express, http://www.mtexpress.com

Some women-only screenings planned for 'Wonder Woman'

Take a seat, "Thor."

Scattered plans among Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas to host women-only screenings of the upcoming "Wonder Woman" movie have produced both support and some grumbling about gender discrimination.

Various locations have taken to social media in response, including the operators of the Brooklyn theater promising on Twitter to funnel proceeds from women-only screenings in early June to Planned Parenthood. And by women only, they mean staff, too.

Some of the screenings were already selling out despite social media haters, many of whom are men, and several have been added.

The offer of special screenings began recently in Austin, Texas, where Alamo has held specialty screenings in the past for military veterans and others. As for "Wonder Woman," the Alamo in Brooklyn posted a statement online saying what better way to celebrate the most iconic superheroine than with "an all-female screening?"

"Apologies, gentlemen, but we're embracing our girl power and saying 'No Guys Allowed' for several special shows at the Alamo Downtown Brooklyn. And when we say 'Women (and people who identify as women)only,' we mean it. So lasso your geeky girlfriends together and grab your tickets to this celebration of one of the most enduring and inspiring characters ever created."

The movie opens June 2 based on the DC Comics character. It was directed by Patty Jenkins and stars Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman/Diana Prince.

Long-awaited display of restored Memphis Belle set for 2018

The fabled World War II bomber Memphis Belle will finally go on public display next spring at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force alongside John F. Kennedy's presidential plane, an early Wright Brothers flyer and other national treasures.

The journey from the flak-ridden skies over occupied France and Germany to restoration and display in the Ohio museum has been long for one of the most celebrated American planes to survive the war.

The B-17F "Flying Fortress," feted as one of the first to make it through the required 25 bombing missions, arrived at the museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in pieces a dozen years ago. It was in rough shape, having been on display outside for decades in its namesake city where it deteriorated from weather and vandalism.

Restoration work by an army of volunteers has continued for years, delayed by a major expansion at the sprawling museum near Dayton and other restoration projects vying for attention. An unveiling of the restored warbird now is scheduled for May 17, 2018 — the 75th anniversary of the crew's 25th and final mission. The Memphis Belle will be displayed as the centerpiece of an exhibit on the strategic bombing campaign that broke the back of Germany's wartime production.

"This is an American icon," said Jeff Duford, curator of the Memphis Belle exhibit. "It's like the flag that flew at Iwo Jima or the USS Arizona. This is one of those things that's truly legendary and represents America and our spirit."

Since B-17 parts are no longer manufactured, volunteers have worked long, painstaking hours fabricating them from scratch and reassembling the plane inside a cavernous restoration hangar at the museum. The wing tips just went on, but the fuselage skin is still being riveted on. And it's still missing the plastic nose cone, tail section and an authentic paint job.

Greg Hassler, who is supervising the restoration, knows the clock is now ticking.

"We will have it done," Hassler vowed. "The airplane will look like it did on its 25th mission on 17 May of next year."

The four-engine bomber bristling with .50-caliber machine guns was piloted by then-Lt. Robert Morgan and had its famous name before it left the U.S. mainland. Morgan, who died in 2004, said it was inspired by his sweetheart, 19-year-old Memphis resident Margaret Polk. The actual moniker came from a riverboat in a John Wayne movie called "Lady for a Night" that Morgan and his co-pilot saw the night before the crew voted on a name.

Before heading for Europe, Morgan flew the bomber to Memphis, where Polk christened it with a bottle of champagne amid much fanfare.

The Memphis Belle, with the leggy Esquire magazine pinup girl painted on the nose, survived six months of punishing air combat in 1942-43 during missions to bomb factories and submarine pens. In doing so, the airplane and its crew beat the odds in a big way. Two out of three young men — their average age was 20 — who flew on those B-17 missions from airfields in England did not survive the war. One out of every 18 planes was lost to combat.

Because the plane's crew members sometimes flew in other planes, they actually completed their requisite 25th mission two days before the Belle, which flew its 25th on May 19, 1943, making it one of the first B-17s to do so.

After being honored by the Army brass and the king and queen of England, most of the original crew and plane were reunited for a highly publicized tour of the U.S. to help sell war bonds in the summer of 1943, including a stop at the same Ohio Air Force base where it will now reside permanently.

A 1944 William Wyler documentary added to the lore of the Belle, while younger generations were introduced to it in a 1990 hit movie that was a fictionalized account of the final mission.

Despite the Memphis Belle's installation at the Air Force museum, the legislature in Tennessee earlier this year designated it as that state's official airplane.

___

Follow Mitch Stacy at http://twitter.com/mitchstacy

Bank forecloses on ‘Extreme Makeover’ homeowner in Michigan

Nearly nine years ago, Arlene Nickless had her home rebuilt on national television. By Monday, she must turn in her keys and leave.

>> Read more trending news 

Designers with ABC’s “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition” helped by hundreds of volunteers — built her family's home in 2008 after the death of Tim Nickless, her husband of 18 years. But keeping up payments on the mortgage has been a struggle, and it was foreclosed in September, the Lansing State Journal reported. It has been up for auction online for weeks.

“When I stepped out of the house the day “Extreme Makeover came, you will see me say ‘I can’t believe this is happening,’” she said. “And, truthfully, that’s what I feel right now: I can’t believe this is happening.”

Arlene Nickless did not blame the ABC television show, whose pricey rebuild have led to foreclosures in some cases, However, she did criticize her mortgage company, the Lansing State Journal reported.

Her home’s foreclosure resulted from an ongoing struggle to manage the property’s pre-makeover mortgage — a balance of about $30,000 after the 2008 makeover, but had ballooned to at least $113,000 by the end of 2016, she told the newspaper.

Eight months after Tim Nickless died in January 2008, more than 1,600 volunteers from the Holt area joined the show’s crew to rebuild the family home, an 1860s farmhouse that had fallen into disrepair.

The old home was demolished, and after a five-day building period, Arlene Nickless and her three sons received a new 3,300-square-foot, four-bedroom home with stone columns, dark wood floors, an indoor water wall, and a retractable flat-screen television, the Lansing State Journal reported.

But the home's annual taxes more than tripled from 2008 to 2009, from about $2,000 in 2008 to about $7,500 in 2009, according to county records.

Those increased taxes and insurance costs were paid through an escrow account, bloating the Nickless family's monthly mortgage payments.

In 2010, Arlene Nickless was in a car crash that caused her to fall behind in making those monthly payments. By late 2010, the property went to a sheriff’s sale, the Lansing State Journal reported.

She filed paperwork to stop the foreclosure the morning of the sale, and the sheriff's deed, which would have given ownership rights to the buyer at the sale, was removed, according to Ingham County records.

At that time, Arlene Nickless said the mortgage lender offered to pay off the loan balance if she could come up with $15,000.

Before she had a chance to gather the money, Ocwen Financial acquired her mortgage in 2011, she said. For the next several years, Arlene Nickless struggled with the loan.

She withheld mortgage payments because she didn’t know where she was sending her money, she said.

“I was trying to find answers,” she told the Lansing State Journal.

Last month, the state of Michigan issued a cease and desist order prohibiting Ocwen Loan Servicing LLC from continued violations of state mortgage law. A press release from the state said Ocwen had a history of improper "servicing and handling of escrow accounts," trouble keeping accurate records and problems with properly crediting payments. 

Ocwen officials said the claims were unfounded.

In September 2016, Nickless' home went to a foreclosure sale again and sold for about $113,000. The six-month redemption period passed with Nickless unable to pull together the needed money.

The house now is listed on the auction website hubzu.com for $176,000.

The spokesman for “Extreme Makeover’s” producers, Endemol USA, declined comment Wednesday. However, the company acknowledged in a 2010 Wall Street Journal article that beneficiaries had issues with the larger-than-life homes and accompanying expenses, so the company scaled back.

Nickless doesn’t know where she’s going or where she’ll store a lifetime of memories, she said. She wanted to share her story in the hopes that it would effect change for others struggling with house payments.

“It breaks my heart to know there are families going through this every day,” she said.

The day Chris Cornell and Eddie Vedder watched the Seattle Kingdome implosion

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell was remembered Friday in a somber memorial service in Los Angeles. A mixture of celebrities and music elite remembered Cornell’s love for his family, and his musical achievements as one of rock’s leading voices.

>> Read more trending news

In Seattle, fan Lee LeFever recalled a day when Cornell and Pearl Jam frontman Eddie Vedder stood together on a Seattle rooftop as a couple of locals, watching the Kingdome implosion.

It was a Sunday, March 26, 2000. The Kingdome, which was the longtime home of the Seahawks, Mariners, boat shows, rock concerts and the occasional religious gathering, was packed with nearly 6,000 dynamite charges. Thousands crowded together on rooftops and overpasses to get a view of the early-morning implosion.

LeFever had a buddy with a construction job downtown, and he and three friends went there for the rooftop view. There were about 50 people milling around, passing time before the 8:30 a.m. implosion.

Then someone said, “Wait, isn’t that Eddie Vedder over there?”

It was, and he was there with Cornell.

Cornell was one of the first people Vedder met outside his Pearl Jam bandmates after moving here in 1990. For a time, the two were neighbors.

“I had no idea how it would affect my life and my views on music and my views on friendship and what a big impact he would have,” Vedder told a crowd before performing with Cornell in September 2011.

After LeFever's story about the Kingdome implosion day appeared in a Seattle Magazine story by Michael Rietmulder, he was told the two rock stars had the same entertainment lawyer, who had a penthouse in the building, which was the Newmark Tower at 1415 2nd Ave.

LeFever, 43, discovered Pearl Jam and Soundgarden as a college freshman in the fall of 1991. He remembers watching one of the band's videos in which Vedder falls into a crowd during a Moore Theatre concert, and thinking, “Wow, that’s what’s happening in Seattle.”

That was a part of what brought him here in 1998 after graduate school, moving to Capitol Hill from Charleston, South Carolina without a job but in love with the idea of living in the Northwest. He felt at the time there couldn’t be two places further apart in so many ways, “and I loved it,” LeFever said.

On the rooftop, Cornell and Vedder casually mingled, holding coffee mugs.

“They were definitely the only people there that were dressed like rock stars, especially Chris Cornell,” said LeFever, who wore a button-down fleece that morning. “He just had the spiked hair and the tight pants and the sort of look of a rock star. And I think Eddie Vedder at the time and even now has an unmistakable look.

“It was just sort of unbelievable to look up and see these people that you only see in TV and magazines and music videos. But they seemed totally normal and totally at ease.”

LeFever thought about approaching. He hatched a plan: Ask them to take a picture of him with the Space Needle in the background. That would be a pretty simple request, and wouldn’t make it weird.

But “I couldn’t work up the courage to say anything at the time,” he recalled.

And maybe that was best, LeFever said. If the same scene had happened today, 17 years later in the era of smartphones and social media, maybe it would have been a mob scene with everyone wanting selfies. It wouldn’t be the same.

“I’m glad," LeFever said, "that maybe at the time it was a place where they could be safe at home in Seattle among their Seattleites and know that people aren’t going to be too crazy.”

LeFever now writes a blog, Camping on Tuesdays, and co-founded Common Craft, an educational video company, with his wife, Sachi. They live in Seattle with their two dogs, Bosco and Maybe. (Yes, they have a dog named Maybe.)

Information from The Associated Press is included in this report. This story also was updated to correct the Pearl Jam video filmed at the Moore Theatre. 

Father writes open letter to Ariana Grande after Manchester explosion

For parents, the suicide bombing earlier this week in Manchester, England, had to hit home.

So many in attendance at the Ariana Grande concert were children or young adults.

And even if your children weren’t in attendance, you felt something real after learning that 22 people were killed in the attack.

>> Read more trending news

Then there’s Grande, a world-famous singer and performer who will live with this for the rest of her life.

Just hours after the bombing, she sent a tweet to her nearly 50 million followers.

Patrick Millsaps, a father of three young girls from Georgia, saw Grande’s tweet and decided to respond.

He penned an open letter to the singer, and the response has been incredible.

The tweet has been retweeted nearly 25,000 times.

In it, he begins by saying, "I am the father of three daughters — ages 13, 12 and 12. So, you have been a part of our family for years.”

He wrote, “I’m afraid I need to set you straight girl. So listen up and receive some redneck love from a daddy of daughters.”

He said such things as, “You don’t have a dadgum thing to apologize for.”

He told her to, “Spend time with your God, your family and your friends who will give you space and support when you need it.”

His last piece of advice was, “When and only when you are ready, on behalf of all dads who love your… um… whose daughters’ love your music SING AGAIN.”

He closed by saying, “So there you go my dear, unsolicited advice from a fat dude in Georgia who loves his daughters and appreciates that there are people like you in the world. Take care of you first. Your fans aren’t going anywhere.”

Grande, who suspended her "Dangerous Woman" world tour and canceled several European shows after the bombing, announced Friday that she will return to Manchester, England, to give a concert to raise money for the victims of Monday’s deadly bombing at her show there.

In a statement, the pop star said, “We won't let hate win” and offered to “extend my hand and heart and everything I possibility can give to you and yours.

Our response to this violence must be to come closer together, to help each other, to love more, to sing louder and to live more kindly and generously than we did before.”

She did not announce a date for the concert.

George W. Bush poses with Bono at Texas ranch

U2 is currently in the midst of the Texas leg of its tour celebrating the 30th anniversary of “The Joshua Tree,” but frontman Bono took some time off from leading stadiums in singalongs to chat with former U.S. president and Texas governor and current Texas resident George W. Bush.

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 The two met Friday at the Bush family ranch in Crawford to talk about “their shared commitment to saving lives in Africa,” according to Bush’s Instagram feed.

It was no big deal. The two were just chilling on a ranch in Texas, talking about saving the world. That’s not bad for a guy who said he once mistook Bono for Sonny Bono.

Bono and Bush have a history of philanthropic work together. Bono has been an avid supporter of Bush’s President’s Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and has enlisted Bush’s help on another AIDS relief charity, ONE.

That type of philanthropic work is not unusual for Bono. U2 is known for its sociopolitical statements, and its current tour focuses on unity, according to our Statesman music critic.

U2 performs in Dallas tonight.

Ben Stiller and Christine Taylor separating after 18 years together

One of Hollywood’s longest-lasting couples is calling it quits.

Entertainment Tonight reported Friday that actors Ben Stiller and Christine Taylor announced in a joint statement they are splitting.

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“With tremendous love and respect for each other, and the 18 years we spent together as a couple, we have made the decision to separate,” the statement said. “Our priority will continue to be raising our children as devoted parents and the closest of friends. We kindly ask that the media respect our privacy at this time.”

The Los Angeles Times reported that Taylor and Stiller, parents to Ella, 15, and Quinlin, 11, were married in May 2000 after meeting on the set of a TV pilot Stiller was developing. They began dating in April 1999 and got engaged that November.

Taylor co-stared with Stiller in several of his films, including “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story,” “Tropic Thunder,” “Zoolander” and “Zoolander 2.”

Ben Stiller and wife Christine Taylor announce separation

Ben Stiller and his wife announced Friday that they are separating after 17 years of marriage.

Stiller and actress Christine Taylor released a joint statement Friday announcing their breakup. They were married in May 2000 and have two children, who they said will remain their priority.

"With tremendous love and respect for each other, and the 18 years we spent together as a couple, we have made the decision to separate. Our priority will continue to be raising our children as devoted parents and the closest of friends," the actors wrote. "We kindly ask that the media respect our privacy at this time."

Taylor has appeared in several of Stiller's films, including "Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story," ''Tropic Thunder" and "Zoolander" and its sequel.

The statement was first reported Friday by "Entertainment Tonight."

Brad Pitt, Dave Grohl and other celebrities pay respects at Chris Cornell's funeral

Soundgarden lead singer Chris Cornell was laid to rest at a funeral service Friday in Los Angeles.

Cornell died of a suicide by hanging at his MGM Grand Detroit hotel room at May 17, only hours after he performed with Soundgarden at the Fox Theatre in Detroit. He was 52.

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Cornell's wife, Vicky Karayiannis, and their daughter, Toni Cornell, were at the service at Hollywood Forever Cemetery, where the musician was buried.

USA Today reported that Cornell’s bandmates, Soungarden drummer Matt Cameron and guitarist Kim Thayil, as well as Audioslave co-founder Tom Morello, delivered eulogies.

Related: PHOTOS: Celebrities pay respects at Chris Cornell's funeral

Actors Brad Pitt, Fred Armisen, Josh Brolin and James Franco attended the service.

The Los Angeles Times reported that Soundgarden’s music played outside the gates of the cemetery before the service.

Other notable rockers at the funeral included Dave Grohl and Taylor Hawkins, of the Foo Fighters; Dave Navarro, Metallica members James Hetfield and Lars Ulrich; and Joe Walsh of the Eagles.

Gavin Rosdale, lead singer of the band Bush, was at the funeral. On Wednesday, he wrote a tribute to Cornell in a post on Billboard.com

“With Chris, there was this innate, beautiful melody and beautiful words that anyone with any degree of sensitivity could relate to and did,” he said of Cornell’s singing voice.

Karayiannis wrote an open letter that was posted by Billboard Wednesday in which she spoke to her husband.

Related: Chris Cornell's widow shares heartbreaking open letter to late husband

“We had the time of our lives in the last decade and I’m sorry, my sweet love, that I did not see what happened to you that night,” the letter read in part. “I’m sorry you were alone, and I know that was not you, my sweet Christopher. Your children know that too, so you can rest in peace.

“I’m broken, but I will stand up for you, and I will take care of our beautiful babies. I will think of you every minute of every day and I will fight for you.” she wrote.

Cornell is survived by his wife and three children.

Company faces backlash for pulling Hannity ads

Financial services firm USAA, facing a backlash to its decision to pull advertising from Sean Hannity's show on Fox News Channel, says it is withdrawing from other opinion-based television programs.

The company, which sells insurance and other products to members of the U.S. military, veterans and their families, had cited its aversion to opinionated programming in backing away from Hannity. The veteran talk show host has become a liberal target because of his focus on a discredited story about a murdered Democratic National Committee staffer.

Yet the conservative watchdog Media Research Center noted that USAA ads had run in recent weeks on left-leaning shows hosted by Rachel Maddow, Lawrence O'Donnell and Chris Matthews on MSNBC.

The ads were placed in error and that mistake is being corrected, said Roger Wildermuth, USAA spokesman. It wasn't clear how the ads could be placed in at least four opinion-based shows in violation of the company's policy; he didn't immediately respond to a question about whether there were more.

Since the liberal advocacy group Media Matters for America posted a list of more than 150 of Hannity's advertisers earlier this week, nine companies have said they no longer wanted to be sponsors. That's only a fraction of the companies that backed out of the since-fired Bill O'Reilly's Fox show last month after news of settlements paid to women to quiet harassment claims.

USAA's decision was particularly disappointing since Hannity has supported veterans organizations, said Brent Bozell, president of the Media Research Center.

The decision provoked an angry response. A Memorial Day posting on the company's Facebook page had nearly 500 comments Friday afternoon, many from people protesting the Hannity decision and vowing to move accounts from USAA.

One woman wrote: "with one boneheaded move, you've made me start looking for a new house and auto insurance, a new bank, a new investment manager."

"It was even more intense than I expected it would be," Bozell said, "and I expected it would be intense."

USAA noted that other companies had seen a backlash from their decisions, too. Wildermuth said USAA's decision on Hannity was not the result of outside pressure.

"We will continually review our ad placements to ensure we are consistent with our policy," he said.

The Latest: Police: Facebook posts led to Comicon arrest

The Latest on an arrest at Phoenix Comicon (all times local):

1:00 p.m.

Phoenix police say there are indications an armed man arrested at Phoenix Comicon is mentally disturbed and that he told detectives he's a crime-fighting comic book character and planned to shoot bad police officers.

Police also say in a probable-cause statement released Friday that officers took Mathew Enrique Nava Sterling into custody at the Phoenix Convention Center after somebody contacted Hawthorne, California, police to report that Sterling was posting threats on Facebook about killing police officers at the Comicon event.

Court documents indicate Sterling lives in suburban Mesa and is 29.

Sterling didn't have an attorney present during an initial court appearance Friday. He spoke only briefly, agreeing when a judge told him it might not be in his interest to comment.

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This story has been corrected to show that court documents spell Sterling's first name as Mathew and indicate his age is 29.

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11:35 a.m.

Phoenix Comicon security has greatly tightened with officials banning all prop weapons after police arrested an armed man who they say allegedly made threats to harm a performer and posted online threats against police officers.

Massive crowds of attendees are experiencing heavy delays Friday as they wait hours in long lines before eventually going through added security screenings and entering the event.

Comic book and science fiction fans are fervently complaining about the Phoenix Comicon organizers' sudden ban on costume prop weapons. They say the fake weapons are often essential in completing costumes and can be extremely costly to build or buy. Prop weapons include swords, sabers and fake guns.

Police didn't identify the performer who allegedly was threatened but say the man arrested Thursday was Mathew Sterling.

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This story has been corrected to show that court documents spell Sterling's first name as Mathew and indicate his age is 29.

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8:35 a.m.

Police say a man who was armed with guns and ammunition when arrested at the Phoenix Comicon allegedly made threats to harm a performer at the event and posted online threats against police officers.

Police didn't identify the performer who allegedly was threatened but say the man arrested Thursday was Mathew Sterling. His hometown wasn't released.

Police say Sterling was taken into custody after a brief struggle at the entertainment and conic convention.

Sgt. Mercedes Fortune says Sterling was jailed on suspicion of attempted murder, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, wearing body armor during the commission of a felony, resisting arrest and carrying a weapon in a prohibited place.

Fortune says officers at Comicon were alerted to a suspicious man making threats against police on social media and the postings included photos of officers working the event.

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This story has been corrected to show that court documents spell Sterling's first name as Mathew and indicate his age is 29.

Jay Z's Tidal streaming service loses its 3rd CEO in 2 years

Jay Z's Tidal streaming service has lost its third CEO in two years.

Tidal said Friday that Jeffrey Toig has left the company, which was launched in 2015. Toig joined Tidal in January 2016.

The streaming service said in a statement that it will announce a new CEO "in the coming weeks" and wishes Toig "all the best in his future endeavors."

Tidal is also co-owned by Beyonce, Madonna, Rihanna, Kanye West and other artists. Sprint announced in January it was buying a 33 percent stake in Tidal, which has more than 40 million songs and 140,000 videos. It is available in more than 52 countries.

Tidal's former CEOs include Peter Tonstad and Andy Chen.

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The Latest: Tom Morello, Josh Brolin eulogize Chris Cornell

The Latest on memorial services Friday for late Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell (all times local):

1:25 p.m.

Chris Cornell's memorial service has ended and mourners are headed to the rocker's burial site as Temple of the Dog's "All Night Thing" plays.

The service Friday included eulogies by guitarist Tom Morello and actor Josh Brolin. Linkin Park's Chester Bennington sang "Hallelujah" for mourners, which included numerous members of rock royalty and Cornell's widow and two young children.

Cornell died last week in Detroit at age 52.

He is being laid to rest Friday at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. A public memorial service is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m. Pacific.

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12:45 p.m.

A private memorial service for Soundgarden singer-songwriter Chris Cornell has begun at a Hollywood cemetery.

The memorial is being attended by numerous members of rock royalty, including Dave Grohl of the Foo Fighters, Dave Navarro of Jane's Addiction, singer-songwriter Joe Walsh and James Hetfield and Lars Ulrich of Metallica.

The ceremony opened with the playing of one of Cornell's most recent songs, "The Promise."

The 52-year-old rocker died last week in Detroit after performing a show with Soundgarden. Officials said a preliminary autopsy showed he hanged himself, but toxicology tests are pending.

Brad Pitt, Josh Brolin and Pharrell Williams were also attending Friday's service at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. A public memorial is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m.

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12:10 p.m.

Pharrell Williams, Brad Pitt and numerous rockers including James Hetfield, Lars Ulrich and Dave Navarro are attending a private memorial for late Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell.

Cornell is being laid to rest at a private memorial Friday at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Other mourners spotted at the service included Joe Walsh, Dave Grohl, Jane's Addiction frontman Perry Farrell, actor Josh Brolin and guitarist Tom Morello, who performed with Cornell in the supergroup Audioslave.

Cornell's widow and two youngest children were also seen arriving at the service, which will be followed by a public memorial at 3 p.m. Pacific time.

The 52-year-old rocker's Soundgarden bandmates also arrived for the memorial, as did Jerry Cantrell from Alice in Chains.

Cornell died last week in Detroit after performing a concert.

Fans gathered outside the cemetery's gates Friday with one of them playing Soundgarden music from a portable speaker.

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11:35 a.m.

Fans are lining up outside the memorial where Chris Cornell will be laid to rest on Friday.

Los Angeles resident Melody Andrade brought her 4-year-old son Jude to Hollywood Forever Cemetery to pay her respects to the late Soundgarden singer-songwriter. The pair wore matching T-shirts that read, "Say Hello 2 Heaven."

Andrade says Cornell's death is on par to her with the loss of rockers Elvis Presley and John Lennon.

Cornell was unresponsive in a Detroit hotel room on May 18 after playing a concert with Soundgarden. The 52-year-old Seattle native was a leading voice in the grunge movement that became mainstream in the 1990s.

About a dozen fans gathered outside the cemetery's gates as mourners began to arrive Friday morning for a private memorial service. One person played Soundgarden music from a portable speaker.

A public memorial and viewing of Cornell's final resting place will be begin at 3 p.m. Pacific.

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1 a.m.

Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell is being laid to rest Friday at Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Los Angeles.

Representatives for the late singer-songwriter say a private memorial service Friday will be followed by a public viewing of Cornell's burial site.

The 52-year-old was pronounced dead May 18 after he was found unresponsive in a Detroit hotel room after a concert performance. Coroner's officials released say preliminary autopsy results show the singer hanged himself, but full toxicology results remain pending. The singer's family has disputed the findings and claim Cornell may have taken more of an anti-anxiety drug than he was prescribed.

Cornell was a leading voice of the grunge movement in the 1990s. Besides Soundgarden, he scored hits with Temple of the Dog and Audioslave. He is survived by his wife and three children.

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